Archive for the tag 'waterloo teams'

Short Season and other stories by Jerry Klinkowitz: a short review

This book lacks the wicked black humor of Klinkowitz’ other baseball novel, Basepaths, with which it shares some characters. All the same, the best stories here are both absurd and delightful, while others are passionate, and others simply preserve well-observed moments. Well worth a few hours of your time.

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Basepaths by Jerry Klinkowitz: a short review

A novel about a hilariously tragic week in the life of a minor league baseball team and its manager. The chapter called Openers, which describes the first inning of the Opening Day game, is absolutely priceless, and the funniest tale I’ve read in years. Other chapters are similarly fun.

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No-Hitter, Two One-Hitters in Twin Bill (1980)

The largest Waterloo Stadium crowd in several seasons–6,180–was treated to sterling pitching performances as the Waterloo (Midwest) Indians swept a doubleheader June 7 from the Appleton Foxes, 3-0 and 1-0.

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Owning a Piece of the Minors by Jerome Klinkowitz: a short review

Jerry Klinkowitz, who teaches at the University of Northern Iowa, was one of the owners of the Waterloo Diamonds from 1978 until they were sold in 1994. This series of essays explores that experience from a variety of perspectives; he talks about how he got involved with the team, about how he wrote a novel (Short Season) based on his ownership experiences, about his grandstand neighbors, about team officer Mildred Boyenga, and about why the Diamonds failed.

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Waterloo Diamonds by Richard Panek: a short review

This book is almost entirely about how the Diamonds died. It’s a portrait of the owners, the team officers, and the city slowing coming to realize that the team was no longer viable, and of the efforts of a large number of people to stave off what was perhaps inevitable. It’s also an exploration of the causes of that death. Waterloo Diamonds is a wonderful, if sad, book, and its great strength is its sympathetic portraits of the principal characters. They didn’t all agree, and their differences are the drama. Excellent book; if you can find a copy I highly recommend it.

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Next Time, Go by Thumb (1968)

Catcher Carl[ton] Fisk of the Waterloo (Midwest) Hawks missed the team bus for a trip to Appleton, Wis., so he decided to hitch-hike.

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Waterloo May Become Baseball’s First Wild-Card Playoff Qualifier (1978)

Organized Baseball’s first wild-card playoffs could become a reality early in September, provided one of the Midwest League’s two First-half divisional champions–Appleton or Quad Cities–finishes on top again in the final second-half standings.

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Perfection, and a note on imperfection

There are no fully reliable sources of information about Midwest League history. Those of us who research MWL history find recording mistakes almost every time we look into something. This is mainly because the records are kept by fallible human beings; fifty-five years is a long stretch and affords many opportunities for errors.

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